Council of Class Presidents meeting, May 2023 USNA

Please excuse my delay with this update from the Spring Council of Class Presidents meeting held at USNA in May. If you have any questions or concerns, please don’t hesitate to let me know.

Thanks so much and have a wonderful remainder of summer!

Fondly,

Denise

Brief by VADM Sean Buck ’83, USNA Superintendent

  • His relief on 7 July will be VADM Yvette Davids ‘89 (update: currently on hold due to Congressional delays)
  • It has been an honor to work at USNA and shape Midshipmen
  • The United States Naming Commission changed the name of Maury Hall to Carter Hall (Buchanan House and Buchanan Rd to be changed at a future date)
  • Infrastructure projects continue: McDonough Hall renovation is 22% complete and the Farragut seawall is in progress
  • Service Academy Gender Relations Survey
    • Sexual assaults have gone up — more reports indicates trust in the system, but more incidents is not good and has my full attention
    • Navy was the worst of the Service Academies
    • 23% of the women and 4.6% of the men said they had experienced unwanted sexual contact in the past 12 months. 65% of the time alcohol was involved.
    • Fixes: Education – Enforcement – Example
    • Lunch is now mandatory and there’s a four-minute drill of discussion around the squad table on a sensitive topic (sexual assault, intoxication, mental health, etc. scenarios). This has helped establish a dialogue and educate Midshipmen
    • Company and athletic team culture assessments are being done
    • The Midshipman Holsen case (charged with rape of a Midshipman in Annapolis and found not guilty in a civilian criminal court case) set the sexual assault program back 15 years
  • Women’s triathlon is our 36th Varsity sport; Navy athletics has had a great year with 13 conference champions, Men’s Rugby is currently #1 in the nation
  • Two new majors: Foreign Area Studies and Data Science
  • Dr. Samara Firebaugh was selected as the next Academic Dean and Provost and will take over from Dean Phillips in July
  • Sea level rise continues to be a problem. A plan is in place to sequentially make changes to the infrastructure from now until 2060. The Columbarium is part of the flooding mitigation plan. The immediate fix is to build some niches up the hill at the cemetery and then long-term move the existing Columbarium to the area off Boyer Rd, after the houses there (across from Gate 8) have been torn down.

Brief by Mr. Chet Gladchuk, USNA Director of Athletics

  • Navy athletics is all about developing future leaders for the Fleet
  • We won the Patriot League President’s Cup in nine of the past ten years and we will win it again this year!
  • Navy football has turned over 16 staff positions. Spring practice went very well. Notre Dame game is sold out. Army-Navy in Boston is a smaller venue and will have 10k fewer tickets.
  • Athletic facilities & strategic planning:
    • Nutrition is a key component of Navy sports facilities and cost $900k/year
    • Fundraising is in progress for the Lacrosse facility next to Glenn Warner Soccer Complex
    • Renovating the seating at the Cooper Rd outdoor tennis courts, as well as at the Brigade Sport Complex, is also in the planning stages
    • New aquatics center is a need with the location TBD
    • Blue side of Navy – Marine Corps Memorial Stadium will have a tower much like the Akerson Tower on the gold side.
    • ‘53 pavilion will be upgraded as an indoor facility that supports 700 people
    • 19th Hole Grill Room at Brigade Sports Complex
    • Greenbury Point is being studied for possible golf course, cross country course, public boat launch and RV park

Posted by Ingar Grev on behalf of Denise Willert on 8/28/23

Hello everyone, and welcome to spring 2023! Please find below a short summary of the December 2022 USNA Council of Class Presidents (COCP) meeting:

COCP Chairman Steve Comiskey, Class of 1969

  • COCP is a key partner with the Alumni Association/Foundation and the Athletic Association
  • COCP is an important conduit for information sharing across the classes, and to ensure that all Alumni feel welcomed

Superintendent VADM Sean Buck, Class of 1983

  • COVID is in the rear-view mirror; ops normal
  • Change to service selection — physically qualified midshipman can go Information Warfare
  • The Yard — refurbishment of McDounough Hall and repairs to Farragut Seawall
  • Key metrics: Graduation rate is 91.2, better than other Service Academies; applications in 2021 dropped about 20 percent
  • Hot button issues:
    • Naming commission — Buchanan House, Buchanan Road, Maury Hall no later than Jan 2024
    • Tamanend — Was never Tecumseh; we do not paint the other bronze statues on the Yard as to do so would be disrespectful; cleaning paint off the statue was wearing down the statue itself, now the base only will be painted
    • COVID 19 vaccine — no diploma or commission was denied and no midshipman have been discharged for not having COVID vacine (note, since this briefing, Congress voted to rescind the DoD COVID vaccine policy)
    • Fixing Farragut seawall is the first of many steps to protect the infrastructure of USNA, to include the Columbarium, from rising sea level

Guest Speaker, Marine Corps General John R. Allen, Class of 1976

  • Significant stresses exist to international stability
  • Migration of wealth and power from West to East
  • Shift to authoritarian and populist governments
  • Increase in urbanization
  • Population growth in developed nations decreasing, in developing nations increasing
  • China and Russia have their own view of the world order
  • Climate change is a destabilizer, and US leadership is important
  • AI will be a threat if not ethically developed, US leadership is important
  • Pandemics will continue to be a threat if you don’t get ahead of them
  • Near-earth objects are a real threat to the planet

Alumni Association and Foundation briefings

  • USNA Foundation exists to raise funds to support the mission of USNA and the Alumni Association
  • Past two fundraising campaigns were very successful — next campaign’s quiet phase to being in April 2024
  • Foundation is looking at establishing an endowment so that giving can occur in perpetuity
  • Alumni Association is back on track with the DGA program; selection panel is very diverse
  • Standards of Conduct established for board members and trustees of the Alumni Association
  • Considering two new Shared Interest groups — surviving spouses and angel investors/contributors
  • Strategic Plan 2030 is ongoing
  • Alumni Center is on schedule and on budget; building with be completed spring/summer 2023; operational fall 2023
  • Priority to the fall of 2023 will go to Mission and Alumni events; beginning in the spring of 2023 there will be an Alumni Center page on usna.com

Athletic Department

  • Two varsity sports added this past year, Men and Women varsity rugby
  • Two more varsity sports to be added this year, Women’s Squash and Women’s Triathlon
  • Physical mission capital projects include: an additional 18-hole golf course of Greenbury Point; updates to the Dyer tennis faciliy; indoor tennis facility will have bleachers and scoreboards; a lacrosse facility and outdoor aquatics facility are in the planning phase; enhancements to NMCMS
  • No thought of moving Air Force game to a neutral site
  • Coaches are working to ensure that players understand that their commitment is beyond four years and not to be shortsighted by using the transfer portal

Mr. Jeff Webb, Class of 1995 — CEO and President, USNA Alumni Association and Foundation

  • Been in the job for six months now, busy working the organization and filling gaps
  • We do not have perpetual dollars and look forward to establishing an endowment
  • AA, Foundation and A&SP are integrated and exist to: Support USNA; Support Legacy projects; Support relationship building with reunions, chapters, tailgates, SIG, SACC, etc
  • New SIGs approved: Naval Engineers and STEM Advocates (NESA), USNA Pride
  • Pending SIG: Entrepeneurs
  • 52 percent of the American public is not aware of USNA — education of the public is a strategic goal

Additional briefers included the USN Athletic & Scholarship Programs; Naval Academy Minority Association; and the Alumni Association Senior Director of Engagment.

The next Council of Class Presidents meeting will be held at the end of April 2023 in Annapolis. I’ll post the next update soon afterward.

Now’s the Time, 89!
Fondly, Denise
’89 Class President

Posted by Ingar Grev on behalf of Denise Willert on 2/25/23

Hopefully you have seen the many emails and postings about the Class of 89 fundraising to honor our Line of Duty Losses. Click here for more details and to donate.

Matching gift challenge: A small group of our classmates have agreed to contribute up to an additional $25K if these monies are matched by class of 1989 members who – as of the Army game – give to the Honor our Fallen fund. This matching gift challenge ends Christmas Eve, so please consider contributing or adding to your current contribution.

Multiyear Pledge Option.

You can stretch your donation over five years and give $89.00 per year, $1989.00, or any amount that fits your budget.

Download this form if you are doing a multiyear pledge. If you use this method, please e-mail Brian Caldwell to let him know.

If you have ANY questions, please do not hesitate to contact Brian Caldwell. Brian is our class point person for the special project.

Posted by Ingar Grev on behalf of Brian Caldwell 12/14/22

Hello everyone, and welcome to spring 2022! Please find below a short summary of the December 2021 USNA Council of Class Presidents (COCP) meeting:

COCP Chairman Steve Comiskey, Class of 1969

  • COCP is a key partner with the Alumni Association/Foundation and the Athletic Association
  • COCP is an important conduit for information sharing across the classes, and to ensure that all Alumni feel welcomed

Alumni Association and Foundation briefings

  • Investment percentage made by the recent $541 million fundraising campaign included 35% to Academics, 21% to Athletics, 17% to unrestricted giving, and 9% to Leadership and Ethics; 85 percent of fundraising goes directly to the need (15 percent staff goes to staff overhead, communications and other fixed costs). Click here for more details
  • Every gift received can be tied to the 2020 USNA and Alumni Association Strategic Plans
  • Alumni Association Board and leadership positions have grown more diverse and younger; the Class of 1992 is the median class for all living Alumni
  • USNA has 59,000 living graduates and 85,000 living Alumni
  • Shared Interest Groups are part of Alumni outreach
  • Service Academy Career Conference (SACC) is going well and is in-person again.
  • New Alumni Center: construction began Oct 2021 with substantial completion expected in March 2023. The new building can accommodate up to 1100 persons for events like reunions. Click here to see live images of the construction progress

COCP participants toured Hopper Hall and the Terwilliger Center

Brief by Superintendant VADM Sean Buck, Class of 1983, at Terwilliger Center

** Please note that comments pertaining to the Physics cheating scandal, DoD Naming Commission, Critical Race Theory, Tecumseh et al have been sent to the class over e-mail.

  • Activities have largely returned to normal
  • Commandant has been charged with growing the Professionalism, Accountability and Esprit de Corps of the Brigade (items most affected by COVID constraints)
  • International programs remain a priority
  • Emphasis on standards of conduct
  • Diversity and inclusion: “We can be diverse, but if we aren’t inclusive, we fail”
  • New majors: Foreign Area Studies (2021) and Data Science (2022)
  • Chapel Dome project is complete
  • Rising sea level: plan to mitigate flooding is in progress

Athletic Department

  • Class of 1965-sponsored Legends of Sports exhibit is on display at the Terwilliger Center
  • Upcoming projects include NMCMS Gardens, Men and Women’s Lacrosse Facility, and the Naval Academy Golf Course (additional 18 holes under consideration)

US Naval Institute

  • USNI has been on the Yard since 1873
  • Still publishing books and reaching a younger audience through live streaming and various forms of media
  • An excellent venue to consider for Class events and reunions

The next Council of Class Presidents meeting will be held at the end of April 2022 in Annapolis. I’ll post the next update soon afterwards!

Now’s the Time, 89!

Fondly, Denise

’89 Class President

Posted by Ingar Grev on behalf of Denise Willert on 3/12/22

I’m writing on behalf of our class board to request your assistance with a project that’s been presented by our USNA Athletic Director, Mr. Chet Gladchuk.

USNA’s Terwilliger Center for Student-Athletes is creating a digital display to commemorate graduates who have demonstrated superlative athletic excellence while at USNA. This display would include the individual’s name, graduation year, associated photos, USNA athletic achievements, contributions to the Navy during his/her service, and subsequent leadership contributions in the community.

I welcome you to think back to our Academy day and nominate those classmates whom you believe would be excellent candidates. All athletes are welcome to be considered, from club sports to varsity. Please strongly consider those individuals who have demonstrated exceptional leadership both in and out of uniform, as well as those who have committed themselves to a lifetime of athleticism.

The nomination should include as much detail as you know, such as the individual’s company, photos, sport played, details of his/her Navy career, as well as any other information you believe to be pertinent.

Please send your submission to “classofficers@usna89.com” no later than 10 June.

Many thanks!

Denise

Posted by Ingar Grev on behalf of Denise Willert on 6/2/21

Happy May, everyone! The spring Council of Class Presidents was held virtually in late April, and I’d like to provide you the following update:

From VADM Sean S. Buck, USN, USNA ’83, Superintendent, U.S. Naval Academy:

  • Normalcy returning to the Yard
  • As of late April, there were no cases of COVID in the Brigade; 99% of the Brigade and 86% of faculty/staff/coaches fully vaccinated
  • Overnight liberty granted again with no issues
  • Spring athletics a success story, despite having practice and games shut down for a month due to a COVID spike
  • Commissioning Week to be in person
  • Plebe Summer Induction 29/30 June
  • Full summer training to resume this year

From Superintendent Q and A:

  • Midshipman Standage is undergoing remediation; if he passes, he will graduate and commission
  • A small handful of Midshipmen were seriously ill with COVID but all are back now
  • USNA does not teach critical race theory
  • Rising water levels at USNA: a formal engineering study to report out in December
  • Youngster physics cheating scandal; Midshipmen involved being adjudicated by Honor Boards

USNA Alumni Association and Foundation update:

  • Alumni Diversity and Inclusion survey complete; 12 percent alumni response
  • 2020 Distinguished Graduates to be recognized in September; 2021 DGAs to be recognized Spring 2022
  • New Alumni Center is on schedule and on budget

Mr. Chet Gladchuck, Jr, Athletic Director:

  • Looking forward to football resuming!
  • Another opportunity possible to go to Ireland; Navy Notre Dame, 2023

Anthony Whalen, USNA Memorial Affairs coordinator:

  • The Columbarium will run out of space in three years; working on an expansion project

That’s the update for this spring. If you have any questions or concerns, please don’t hesitate to reach out and let me know. All the best to everyone … Now’s the Time, 89!

Fondly,

Denise

’89 Class President

Posted by Ingar Grev on behalf of Denise Willert on 5/28/21

The USNA Council of Class Presidents meets twice a year to discuss issues of importance to the Naval Academy and its alumni. Below are highlights from this fall’s meeting, held virtually in early November:

Comments from guest speaker LTGEN Dave Beydler, USMC (Ret.), Co-Chair, Special Committee on Alumni Culture, Diversity and Inclusion:

  • Committee conducted weekly two-hour meetings with input from alumni this summer and fall
  • Preliminary recommendations support fostering greater appreciation of each other, greater transparency, and expansion of diversity participation and engagement
  • An all-Alumni survey is forthcoming

Comments from the US Naval Academy Alumni Association and Foundation:

  • Chapel Dome memorabilia sales are greater than $1.2 million, providing support to the Midshipman Activities Fund
  • Hopper Hall Cyber Security Center ribbon cutting was held on 15 October
  • The Naval Academy Campaign closed in September with more than $500 million raised
  • The Service Academy Career Conference (SACC) experienced 20 percent increase in alumni attendance
  • More than 4000 alumni participate in the Alumni Mentoring Program (AMP)

Update on the Alumni Center Project:

  • The project is on budget, expected completion summer/fall 2022
  • The Center will be a 68K square foot building with on-site and nearby parking for more than 100 vehicles
  • Class giving opportunities at the $250K and $100K levels
  • Individual plankowner opportunities for those who pledge $12,500 by December 2022

Guest Speaker VADM Sean Buck, Superintendent:

  • Social distancing protocols continue in place on the Yard
  • Random COVID testing weekly for 10 percent of the USNA population
  • 372 midshipmen are housed in St. John’s College dormitories to permit establishment of isolation rooms in Bancroft
  • Midshipmen will start winter break after the Army Navy game; the Brigade will return 5 January 2021
  • Midshipman 1/C Standage case: currently under litigation
  • Diversity:
    • Racism not systemic at USNA, a task force established to take a top-down look
    • Changes to the names of buildings will only come from top-level Navy leadership
    • There’s been a temporary pause on painting Tecumseh due to feedback from the Midshipmen Diversity Team

Update from Mr. Chet Gladchuk, Jr, Athletic Director:

  • There’s been a loss of revenue due to COVID constraints
  • We need to do all we can to sustain our athletic programs
  • Football team will play Army at West Point this year

Take care, friends, and have a wonderful December!

Now’s the Time, 89!

Denise

’89 Class President

Dear Classmates,

I hope this update finds you and your family well during this very challenging and difficult time.  Remember, we’re all here for each other, so if you’re needing some assistance, please don’t hesitate to reach out.

Please allow me to share highlights from the recent Council of Class Presidents meeting, a twice-a-year gathering sponsored by the Alumni Association and Foundation.  This spring’s meeting was virtual and well attended, with an interesting variety of important topics discussed:

Current state of USNA and the Brigade (as briefed by the Commandant, Captain Thomas R. Buchanan):

  • All midshipmen are sheltering in place INCONUS, with approximately 40 to 50 midshipman residing in Bancroft Hall.
  • The number of midshipmen infected by COVID is in the single digits, with no hospitalizations.
  • A virtual graduation is planned for the class of 2020, with more details to be announced.
  • Plebe summer will occur, with details under discussion.

Alumni Center project

  • $22M building project for a 65,000 square foot building across from Bishop Stadium on King George Street.
  • Construction begins October 2020, and is complete July 2022.
  • August 2020 Shipmate will discuss class naming opportunities, similar to those at Navy and Marine Corps Memorial Stadium.
  • Expected class naming opportunities at 100K and 250K milestones.
  • Individual recognition opportunities at 12.5K; this donation also counts toward the class financial milestone.

Virtual Service Academy Career Conference (SACC)

  • Outstanding participation: 63 companies and 502 job seekers.
  • SACC Central is online with postings for jobs.

Alumni Mentoring Program (AMP)

Almost 4,000 alumni participate in a Mentor/Protégé relationship through the Alumni Mentoring Program (AMP). Please consider participating! We have a lot to offer to fellow alumni that might be transitioning out of the service or to a new career field.

Chapel Dome Heirlooms

Renovations are currently underway to replace the aging copper dome. Herff Jones is offering heirlooms from material salvaged, to include ornaments, jewelry, challenge coins, and framed heirlooms. Click here for more information and to purchase!

Objective Zero

Objective Zero, a Class of 1998 initiative, is an app that leverages existing support networks (classmates) to provide timely support to Veterans through their hard days. The objective of the initiative is zero additional suicides. A motion was approved by the COCP to formally request that the Alumni Association and Foundation and NAAA recognize Objective Zero at Navy sporting events.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this brief update, and I’m glad to answer any questions you might have.  Please feel free to contact me anytime at denise.willert@1989.usna.com.

Stay safe and healthy! Now’s the Time, 89!

Fondly, Denise

Posted by Ingar Grev on May 5, 2020

Hey Classmates, here’s  a host of gouge about the latest at USNA from the last Council of Class Presidents Meeting

Recent Drug Ring news: Many of us have heard about Midshipman Zachary Williams who was charged with distributing illegal drugs. Superintendent VADM Ted Carter told us that the investigation by NCIS has been going on for awhile, and it was brought about by a midshipman turning someone in. There were about 7-8 users and 1 distributor (I’m assuming that MIDN Williams is the one who is being charged with being the distributor). Most of those involved were Youngsters and Plebes.


Investment in Midshipmen / Cost of Being Separated. The cost of being separated can be pretty large. Depending on the circumstances, a firstie can wind up owing the federal government $202K. Two firsties who were separated for DUI recently owed that much.

The total burdened cost of graduating a midshipman is $428K. Total burdened cost includes stuff like USNA housing, maintenance, utilities, etc. – basically taking the entire budget allocated to USNA and dividing it by the number of midshipmen. USAFA costs $160K more and USMA is 17% more. The cost difference is not necessarily because we’re more awesome (which we are) – it’s driven by our smaller campus, our smaller staff, and more graduates.


There’s a great deal of construction underway or planned!

Rickover Hall. Believe it or not, RIckover Hall is OLD, so a $52M overhaul is scheduled to begin in 2019. That overhaul doesn’t include the labs just yet, but those will be an additional $10M (if I’m reading my notes right).

Ricketts Hall. I’m not even sure we should still be calling this building Ricketts Hall, because it is completely different from the barracks and football offices we had when we were mids. Anyway, it’s been under construction again and should be done by 2019.

McDonough Hall. Remember this building was being renovated when we were plebes? Well it’s going through another facelift inside. It’s our most used athletic building! Didn’t know that.

Chapel Dome. The base of the dome will go through $7M-$8M of repairs to fix leaks and mold problems.

Hopper Hall. The primary focus of our class project, Hopper Hall should complete its $106M construction in late 2019 (if we’re lucky, it will be in time for our reunion, but no promises!). Here are some stats:

  • It’s a little smaller than Rickover
  • When complete, most engineering will move there
  • Power grid connection is a challenge because the grid is OLD
  • It will have a robotics pool (that’s cool – a place for cyborgs to hang out, I guess)
  • It will have a big SCIF capable of hosting meetings, and no other service academy will have that scale of capability
  • Not building related – our Cyber program recently received “zero” comments while being accredited by ABET (Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology). Ours was the first Cyber program to be accredited and – apparently – no one ever gets zero comments during the inspection process.

Parking Garage. There’s been quite a bit of drama surrounding this new structure, but it’s finally open and SAFE to use. There are 374 spots in the garage, resulting in a net increase of 60 spots, even after the loss of the “waffle lot.”

Naval Academy Bridge. This is the “new” bridge completed in the 90s that replaced the old Route 450 drawbridge  across the Severn. The lights used on it have always been an issue, so USNA fixed them using lights that we use on Stribling Walk. Apparently they’ve been a great success.


Sports.:Last spring was the best season EVER for Navy with a 70% winning percentage. Men’s Tennis won the Patriot League and played ultimate National Champion Wake Forest in the first round of the NCAA tournament. Navy’s Triathlon Club won the overall club title at the collegiate club national championships with the men finishing first and the women finishing third. Read more: https://www.teamusa.org/USA-Triathlon/News/Articles-and-Releases/2018/April/28/US-Naval-Academy-Wins-Overall-Club-Title-at-USA-Triathlon-Collegiate-Club-National-Championships

2nd Class Noah Song pitched a 9 inning shutout against Army in Fenway Park.

The direct-to-pro athlete program is no longer in place – we’re back to the David Robinson model of at least two years of active duty before having a chance to go pro.

There’s a chance that the 2023 Army game will be at Gillette stadium in Foxborough, MA.

The Showtime program, A Season with Navy Football (editorial note: which is thankfully over), is up for 2 Emmy Awards.


2017  Seventh Fleet collisions: There’s been a great deal of discussion over whether USNA can help the Navy improve basic seamanship. Here’s some gouge:

  • YP and SeaNav training for OCS and NROTC: NROTC is viable given the summer schedule; OCS is problematic with scheduling.
  • Moving MoBoards up to plebe year (didn’t we have MoBoards plebe year?) so that Youngsters can start looking at application during summer cruise.
  • We are getting a new fleet of 12 YPs.

Applications / Admissions / Graduation: All colleges are seeing decreasing applications, and so is USNA, but we are seeing a BIG increase in the number of applications we receive from women and minorities. We got about 16,000 total applications for the class of 2022, which is more than USAFA (10K) and USMA (12K).

There are 1185 spots in an incoming class. Of those 16,000 applications, about 3500 are fully qualified for those spots. You may notice that that number is smaller than the number of spots we had on I-Day (what was it, about 1360?). The reasons for this are:

  • Faculty quality
  • Admissions process – we are better at deciding who should get an appointment
  • Academic Center of Excellence – tutoring / additional classroom work.

When we were there, the expected attrition rate was about 21%, 6-8% of which were academic. Now attrition is about 11-12%, and most of it is voluntary (1.5% is academic). In Plebe Summer, only about 10 midshipmen separate.

Average Brigade size is 4400.

99% of midshipmen get there first and second choice for service selection, and submarines have once again become a hot ticket (things were a little dicey about a decade or so ago).

Here’s some interesting analysis from the Academic Dean (Dean Phillips):

Nationwide, there are 1474 schools that offer 4-year degrees and graduate 100 or more people a year. Of those, only 41 graduate 50% or more with STEM degrees (Only 41! Yikes!). Of these schools, USNA has the highest graduation rate in 4 years – 88.8% — and most of those other schools use 6 years for their graduation rate. In other words, we do more in 4 years than they do in 6. In 4 years, the average graduation rate for those schools is 29%, and it’s 59% in 6 years. Interesting to note that those 41 schools DO NOT include Army or Air Force – less than 50% of their graduates are STEM majors.

  • Class of 2021 stats are
  • 73% male / 27% female
  • 37% are members of a racial/ethnic minority
  • 14% are the first in their family to attend college
  • 11% are first generation American (like me!)
  • 5% are prior enlisted
  • 62% were in the top 10% of their class (seems low?)
  • 92% were Varsity Athletes in high school
  • 90% were active in Community Service
  • 66% were student body leaders
  • 30% had significant work experience
  • 16% were Boy/Girl Scouts